Film Festival Wrap-up

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Film Festival Wrap-up

Photo courtesy of New Mexico Spotlight Foundation

Photo courtesy of New Mexico Spotlight Foundation

Photo courtesy of New Mexico Spotlight Foundation

Photo courtesy of New Mexico Spotlight Foundation

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At the latest iteration of the KMSD Film Festival, students and adults alike were treated to numerous short films, music videos, and documentaries, including some made by students at Kettle Moraine Middle School. 

The middle school films were mostly short commercials for various items. For example, one made by Bram Peterson showed a student struggling to eat cereal with a fork because all the spoons were dirty, then struggling to eat waffles with a spoon when all the forks were dirty. The student then 3D prints a spork, solving all of her silverware problems.

Middle school films were awarded three awards. Third place was taken by Abby Dietrich, with “Headphones.” Both second and first place were taken by Trygg Johnson, with “The Heist” taking second and “Doritos” taking first.

In the next category, “American Teen” took Best Music Video. It was directed by Grace McMahon, and starred Max Andrews, Rachel Czestler, Megan Pashke and Grace McMahon.

“From Seeds To Roots,” directed by Writing Focus senior Makenna Boettcher, won Best Short Film. Other films included a collaborative portfolio about mental illness by Hope Horne and Hannah Tyler, and a superhero spoof about KMHS’s mascot, Captain Laser. 

Four documentaries were submitted into the festival, three of which were written, directed, and produced by Mrs. Beal’s AP English Language and Composition  class. The fourth was a documentary following the Rube Goldberg competition earlier this year. The winner was Claire Vock’s “Found Families,” a documentary about the benefits of adoption and the impact adoption has had on some Kettle Moraine School for Arts and Performance (KM Perform) students’ lives. 

This year’s Film Festival was a great opportunity to showcase student work, and display the promise of the future of Kettle Moraine student filmmakers.